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NEWS NAEB LETTER 

NAKOHALASSOCIATION •- EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

Prank E. Sehooley, Editor, Station WILL, Urbana, Illinois 


February 1, 1943 


COLLEGE-LEVEL PROGRAM SURVEY UNDER WAT 


Editor's note - The following reprint from Broadcasting, Issue of January 
35, 1943, tells the story; 

With universities and oolleges faolng ourtallment because of the war, 
the Assn! for Education by Radio and the National Assn, of Educational 
Broadcaster^shortly will survey the Industry to determine the eatent 
and effectiveness of "university level" broadcasting. 

Itself. 

symphony music and others that n&tuxe* 

they are originated by the station which makes the report. 

Icllno™ 11 gove^ent! a etc!; tpe' of yxesentatlon^ ^“^^^^ow'and 0 ^^ 

whom e serles U is’oromoted "m sponsored; concreteevidenceofachlevement of 

purpose, and how it is measured, Whether Oroaeiey, registration, man, 
phone t student responseo 

When the results of the survey fproSaml'to^he 

will bs able to ascertain how tors can utiii.e presen^p^gr 

oast si^The*survey^wlll £* ££8- Uer the direction of Michael a. Hanne, 








NAEB NEiVS LETTER.Page 


..February 1, 1943 


general manager of WHOU, Ithaca, N« Y.. and chairman of the AER survey 
committee* 

"SOUS OF THEIR FATHERS” OK K F K ,U_ 

A radio series, "Sons of Their Fathers," was inaugurated f®®**^* flaa 

station KFKU. This weekly series of programs consists of stories of Kane s 
men and hoys in the oresent war; unusual or courageous a *T®:“*]f*° u 2 0 _ ee _ 
stories, sad or humorous stories, of native Kansans ifc our fitting force • 
Each broadcast consists of one story* 

A number of interesting stories whioh should be of ^®*®®* 

Kansans have been sent to the Kansas Biographer to be told by him on these 

broadcasts. 

Ho material will be used on these broadcasts Which does not oonform with 
the regulations of the United States Office or Censorship. 

HEAR. MICHISAN STATE. CARRIES STATE PROGRAMS 

To function fully in a democracy, government must keep thepeopleawareof 
what is happening, especially in ^ose departments wnioh administer jiblic 
resources and activities. For years WEAR has been able Jo serve! m*-- -~ 
aeiiias Whereby the departments of state government have discussed their poi 
idee and problems with the people of Mlohigan. 

Seven departments, all of which are working in the 

heard each week during this month. They have a message for eve y 

who is interested in the welfare of his state. 


Tuesday at Is00 — 
Wednesday at 1:00 
Wednesday at 2:30 
Thursday at 1:00 - 
Friday at 1:00 — 

Friday at 2:00 - 

Saturday at 5:30 - 


- Michigan Department of Agriculture. 

-Michigan Department of Health. 

_-Michigan Civil Service Department. 

Michigan Insurance Department. 

* Michigan Highway Department. 

Michigan Department of Public Instruction. 
- Michigan Conservation Department. 


Some day the war will end and until that day every wwld° 

nt*8 SSrHSTiS Sri involved and" some POssiW.e f Solution.._ 

^Sr^^eecL^roI.^K^has been'a ^ber of th4 Michigan 
State College faculty for sixteen years, ^during^whioh 

olosely associated with debate as.-.., *...rr •- • _ 

the student dieousslons over WEAR for several years. 

Leaders throughout the world h^^ ^^g ^^^eala^rovld^inBpirAtio^to 






NAEB NEtfS LiCTTEH* 


.Page ..February 1, 


1943 


an Interview with one of these world leaders is described by ??^ er n 
M* Bartlett, who has for years carried on such interviews as a Dr * 

Bartlett, author, traveler, and leoturer, has recently come to Lansing* He 
has been on the faculty of Springfield College and Boe.on University and 
was for three years at Teaching University in China. He is the author of a 
number of books f one of which bears the title of his radio program. 

THE SYRACUSE RADIO WQHK3H0P AMD THE WAR 

Syracuse University's radio programs for the next few months are concerned 

with the suhjeot most vital to us all --- America' 8 -^h^nternretatlon 
programs are Informative and will provide background for thelnterpretatlon 
ofwar newe; some are designed to inspire Skater loyalty and intereet ln_ 
American inetltutione, and others are concerned directly with citizen war 
morale, according to an announcement by William Pearson Tolley, Chancellor. 

Experts from the University's faculty will Pissent most of *he programseo 
that yo« may obtain authoritative material, men 

the staff work Incidental to these features Is &Y 2*5* SfSiI training 

preparing for technioal radio work In our war effort and by girls training 
to take men* s plaoes in radio station operation* 

The Workshop was cooperatively built In 1937 Py Syracuse University and 
radio stations WFBL jftad WSYR. It ie one of the few oaaes ln the ^ited 
States where broadcasting stations have cooperated with a large university, 

not only in building studios but also by partly:Mb?ary^d 
orocrams as well* The studios are looatfcd in the University hiorary ana 
ooniist S of 8 eightrooms, including tow studios, two reception rooms, offices, 
and a control room and transoriution center, ^acn u&y ra f* e . 

eity students participate In one or more of the University’s radio aotiviti®. 
Thepersonnel for Workshop programs consists o cue director, Eenne Hnnner 
Bartlett; Dorothy Ward, In charge of sor lost and £.^duction; Kathryn Hopp , 
secretary; and Lawrence Barnes, engineer. All o.c the 3 taffwork in ^tting 
programe on the air is handled by students preparing for professional 
radio work. In the last few years almost 100 University students have gone 
into commercial broadcasting. Fully a third of these are now in the nation 
armed services® 

KOAO APPLIES FOR AUXILIARY TRANSMITTER LICBI_SE_ 

The Federal Communications Commission reports that KOAC, Oregon ^tate, 
applied for a license to use formerly licensed main transmitter as an auxii 
iary with power of 1 KW. The application was filed with the FPO on January 

11 . 


—Schooley 






Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


'oiTu> c KTwe 
\\KWAVEs 


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